A Diet for Dreamers: Dream Again!

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Wisdom and encouragement to feed your Dreams, Installment #2

Ever have a school teacher scold you for having your “headdaydream-2 in the clouds”? Sure, daydreaming while you should be paying attention is counterproductive, but on the other hand, we all need dreams to be healthy and happy. Having a dream, a goal to accomplish, a project to complete, adds to our sense of purpose and self-worth — which in turn helps to give us hope. And we NEED hope! Without hope we lose spirit and eventually stop truly living. We lose our enthusiasm for life, and we find ourselves just going through the motions of everyday existence, shuffling along mindlessly like one of those zombies in Night of the Living Dead: no heart, no soul.

Forget milk. Got enthusiasm? Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, founder of the inspirational magazine Guideposts, wrote several volumes on the subject, but he managed to sum up the main idea in a single book title: Enthusiasm Makes the Difference!

Interestingly, the word enthusiasm means “full of God,” which shouldn’t be too surprising because, after all, it’s God who created each of us and then filled us with life. So take heart when things go wrong, because God loves you, and He cares about you!

Yes, you say, but does God care about my hopes and dreams? Listen: “‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you, and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future.'” (Jeremiah 29:11 NIV)

So trust God, and dream again!

Today’s quote for those who dream great things:

“It’s faith in something and enthusiasm for something that makes a life worth living.”  — Oliver Wendall Holmes, Sr., Physician, author and lecturer, 1809-1894

We invite readers to join us here each weekday for words of wisdom, humor and encouragement.

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Encouragement for Creators: Got Rejection?

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Wit, wisdom, and inspiration for writers, artists, musicians, and crafters!

“No prophet is accepted in his hometown.”

Who said that? Jesus Christ (Luke 4:24 NIV), right after he got rejected in, of all places, the village where He grew up — and Jesus was the greatest teacher and the best storyteller who ever walked this planet, bar none! Remember all those cool parables, the ones we’re still reading and referenciphotodune-3789413-rejected-letter-illustration-of-mail-envelope-over-white-background-xs1-300x268ng today — almost 2000 years after He shared them? Of course. How many modern writers continue to riff on “The Story of The Good Samaritan” or “The Prodigal Son”? How many financial experts on “The Parable of the Talents”? And yet, even Jesus faced his share of rejection in that arena. In fact, rejection, for Jesus, was always in the plan. He had to be rejected before he could be exalted, put down before He was lifted up. And if people rejected Jesus (!!!) … well, we ought to be able to handle a little rejection ourselves. Consider it a rite of passage. You won’t be anyone special until you’ve received your share of rejection.

Know who else got rejected? Do you have a favorite author? Yes, him too. Yeah, her also. Obviously your favorite writers didn’t give up. They stayed the course no matter how hard it got or how long it took. You need to do the same.

Want to hear something funny? Dr. Laurence J. Peter submitted a non-fiction manuscript to McGraw-Hill in 1964. An astute editor at the publishing company responded: “I can foresee no commercial possibilities for such a book and consequently can offer no encouragement.” Undeterred, Dr. Peter sent the manuscript to thirty other publishers and received thirty more rejections. Finally, William Morrow & Co. purchased his book for a single payment of $2,500; and the publisher’s expectations for it were so low that the company ordered an extremely cautious print run of only 10,000 copies. But hey, editors and publishers are only human: how could they know — despite being in the business of recognizing profitable book projects — that The Peter Principle would rocket to the top of the New York Times best-seller list?; or that the book would sell 200,000 copies its first year in print?; or be translated into 38 languages? Good grief, it’s a good thing the good doctor didn’t give up on a good book idea! (How’s that for a good sentence?)

Got Rejection? Welcome to an elite club that boasts a membership comprised of the world’s best and greatest. Next Friday, we’ll share Jesus’ advice to those who receive a rejection slip. In the immortal words of Jack Lord, star of that ’70s show Hawaii Five-O, “Be here! Aloha!”

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