Yolks and Folks! (Angel in the Kitchen)

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Not long ago, we compared past mistakes and failures to scrambled eggs, reminding you that what’s done can’t be undone — so you need to forget the past and focus on the future. To ensure you don’t get bored with what we’re serving up in Angel in the Kitchen, we’ve decided to move on to a totally new topic offering fresh insights. We’re done with scrambled eggs. Today, we discuss omelets! How’s that for being different? (Hey, our humor can be eggs-quisitely painful.)

What can the omelet teach us? Before we dish out that info, let’s first learn some cool facts about eggs. (Trust us, we’re not stalling. This will all tie in later.)

Eggs are a very versatile food: they can be boiled, poached, pickled, fried, scrambled, deviled, made into omelets, blended into shakes, or added to cakes, pies, puddings and soufflés. And if you’re Rocky Balboa, you can crack six of them into a tumbler and drink ’em down raw before you go out to jog the streets of Philly. (Yo, Adrian, I did it!)

There are many types of eggs used in recipes, the most popular being hen eggs. There are around eight varieties of hen eggs. Other types include quail eggs, ostrich eggs, emu eggs, duck eggs, and Guinea Fowl eggs. There are different colors, too. Hen eggs can be white, speckled, or range from buff to light golden brown to a dark reddish brown. There’s even a green-tinted egg, the Ameraucana. Eggs also come in different sizes. An average size Ostrich egg is about 13 centimeters or 6 inches and weighs roughly 3 pounds. One of these babies is equal to 12 extra large hen eggs, so you could feed breakfast to a family of four using a single egg. Of course, Ostrich eggs may be hazardous to your health; ostriches are good parents, and they can run over 40 mph! Oh, and they have really big feet to stomp you with!

The smallest bird egg comes from the bee hummingbird, and averages about a quarter-inch. Not much food in these, but come on, who wants to deprive the world of another cute little hummingbird?

For the purpose of making a point, we’ll stick to hen eggs in the preparation of our omelet today. Interestingly, despite the difference in the color of their shells, which do nothing more than indicate the type of hen they came from, all hen eggs are pretty much the same. Inside, their yolks are yellow and they have the same nutrional value. Lots of info, but what’s our point? A very simple one, which we hope to reinforce by sharing all these cool facts. Namely, people are like eggs. We come in all sizes and colors. We come from different ethnic groups and nationalities, just as cooking eggs come from many different types of fowl. Yet we are all equal.

And what’s really amazing about eggs AND people? If you have a mind to — we repeat — if you have a mind to, you can blend the many differing types and colors into a single delicious “omelet.” Once you do, you won’t be able to distinguish which eggs were used. Looks like an omelet. Tastes like an omelet. Hey, it is an omelet!

God desires all of humankind to blend together in the same way. We’re all the same inside, so why can’t we join together? We may have slightly different flavors (strengths, gifts, abilities, backgrounds and experiences), but those differing flavors can blend together beautifully in an omelet (family or church,  organization or community). Throw in some Holy Spirit seasoning, and we’ll have one incredibly palatable world.

“There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” (Galatians 3:28 NIV)

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Mind the Language! (Angel in the Kitchen)

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Hot DOGS and HAM burgers! Seriously? Of course not. There’s no ham (or pork of any kind) in a hamburger. And you can eat a hotdog in front of your pet dachshund without feeling guilty. But these food names are just two examples of our crazy, sometimes confusing, English language. In the kitchen, in particular, our loony lingo truly takes the cake.

It turns out a pig in a blanket is perfectly kosher — as long as you’re eating a Hebrew National frank. By the way, we’re confused. What’s the difference between a hotdog (also hot dog), a frankfurter and a wiener? Can we please reach a consensus on what to call these sausages? Why do hot dogs need a whole pack of names. Woof!  Oh, and does “spicy” mean flavorful from spices, or simply HOT — a quality derived from the addition of peppers? There’s no consensus on that one, either.

A Dutch oven isn’t an oven at all. It’s just a heavy, lidded POT — the kind you cook with, not what hippies and politicians used to smoke. French fries are not French; bread pudding is not the kind of pudding many think, it’s a dense gelatinous mass of flour and raisins; a grilled cheese sandwich isn’t really grilled; and is barbecue a cooking process, or a Southern dish of pulled pork?

What’s up with eggplant? Did it grow from an egg? Maybe it’s the offspring of chickweed. Ouch! Also, we hate for this to get out, but there’s no egg in an egg cream drink. Do you love pizza? We do, too. We also love our friends, family, and our Lord. Wonder how God feels when we apply the same term of devotion to Him as we do to a slab of dough smeared with tomato sauce? In other languages — Spanish, for instance — there are separate verbs for differing types and levels of “love.” Here, though, we can honestly say we love our spouse and the dog.

Adding to the confusion are regionalisms, (expressions that developed in certain areas of the country) and slang. “He’s a real piece of work” sounds good, but it ain’t. “She’s a space cadet.” Wouldn’t you need to be smart to go to Space Academy? “Let’s take a ride.” (No, we don’t want to bump you off.)

Love is a many splendored thing — literally.  We LOVE pizza!!  ♥♥♥

We’ll drive in the parkway, and then park in the driveway.  –Hey!! We’re about to run a stoplight! Or is it a “traffic light”? After all, it signals us to stop AND go.

We’ve read that the English language is one of the most difficult “second” languages to learn due to all it’s exceptions. Spelling?  “I” before “E” except after “C” — but only on the third Wednesday of every other month. Does grammar sometimes prey on your mind? Maybe you should pray about it? What’s the difference between “read” and “read”? Depends on whether you’re starting a book or finishing it.

We could go on. But we simply want to emphasize that mastering the English language — and therefore, verbal communication — isn’t a piece of cake. Nor is it easy as pie. Often, we have trouble saying what we mean, and we don’t actually mean what we say. HELP!!!

God admonishes us to take care in what we speak, and in how we speak it. For instance: “Gentle words are a tree of life; a deceitful tongue crushes the spirit.” (Proverbs 15:4 NLT)

Furthermore, research states that 80% of all communication is non-verbal. Our eyes, hands, and even our posture speak volumes. And we all know that “Actions speak louder than words.” In fact, people pay more attention to what we DO than to what we say. “Seeing is believing”! Application? Don’t simply talk about the teachings of Christ, MODEL them! Saint Francis of Assissi wrote, “Preach the Gospel at all times and when necessary use words.”

“…Prove yourselves doers of the word, and not merely hearers who delude themselves.” (James 1:22 NASB) “…Speak my Word in truth….” (Jeremiah 23:28 NLT)

In other other words, say what you mean and mean what you say.

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